History of Jack Nicholson

John Joseph "Jack" Nicholson (born April 22, 1937) is an American actor, director and producer. He is known for his often negative themed roles of deranged characters.

Nicholson has been nominated for the Academy Awards twelve times. Jack has won the Academy Award for Best Actor twice for the films' One Fluor Over the Cuckoo's Nest 'and As Good as It Gets'. He received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for the 1983 film Terms of Endurance.

Nicholson is the equivalent of Walter Brennan winning the most awards (three) won by a male actor for acting, and second only to Catherine Hepburn in terms of most awards won (four) for acting as a whole. He is one of only two actors to be nominated for an Academy Award for acting (lead role or assistant) every decade since the 1960s (the other being Michael Caine). He has won seven Golden Globe Awards and received the Kennedy Center honors in 2001. In 1994, he was one of the youngest actors to receive the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award.

Early life

Nicholson was born at St. Vincent's Hospital in New York City and was the son of showgirl June Francis Nicholson (the stage name June Nilsson).

Biographer Patrick McGillan has said of Jack's life that Latvia-born and June manager Eddie King (originally Edgar A. Kirsfeld) could also be a father and other sources said June Nicholson could not decide. Find out who his father is. Nicholson's mother was of Irish, English and Dutch descent [5], although she and her family identified Khrud as Irish.

Nicholson was raised by the belief that his grandparents were John Joseph Nicholson (who was a department store window dresser in Manasquan, New Jersey.) And Ethel May Rhodes (who was a barber, beautician and amateur artist in Manasquan) He had parents. Indeed, it was only in 1974 that Nicholson discovered that his "parents" were in fact his grandparents, after being told the truth by a journalist from Time magazine, who was doing a feature on Nicholson in 1974. And his sister was his mother.

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By that time both his mother and grandmother had died (in 1963 and 1970, respectively). Nicholson said he did not know who his father was and that "only Ethel and June knew about it and they never told anyone" and decided not to pursue the case or to undergo a DNA test. did.

Nicholson grew up in Neptune City, New Jersey. A theater and a drama award were named in his honor at the school. In 2004, Nicholson attended his 50-year high school reunion with his aunt Lorraine Kay.

Early acting career

When Nicholson first arrived in Hollywood, he worked at MGM Cartoon Studios as a film set assistant for animation masters William Hannah and Joseph Barbera. Seeing his talent as an artist, he offered Nicholson the role of an animation artist at an early stage. However, he refused for the role, citing his desire to become an actor.

He made his film debut in 1958 with the lead role in the low-budget teen drama - The Cry Baby Killer. For the next decade, Nicholson appeared as an occasional collaborator with filmmaker Roger Corman. Korman directed Nicholson on several occasions, most notably The Little Shop of Horrors, in which he played the role of a desperate sexually challenged patient (Wilver Force), films The Raven, The Terror, and The Saint Valentine's Day Massacre.

Rise to fame

Nicholson also co-wrote (Bob Refelson) for the film Head, played by the Monkeys. In addition, he also arranged the soundtrack for the film. However, Fonda and Hopper had their first major acting opportunity due to vacant vacancies in Easy Rider. Nicholson played the hard-hitting lawyer George Hanson, for which he received an Oscar nomination for the first time.

The following year he received a Best Actor nomination for his performance defining personality in Five Easy Pieces (1970), which included the famous "Chicken Salad" dialogue about Tum Woh Ko Achcha Hai Chahta Hai. In the same year, he appeared in the film version of On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, but a large part of his role permeated the floor of the cutting room.

Nicholson was friends with the director long before Polanski's wife Sharon Tate died at the hands of the Manson family, and he supported her in the days following her death. After Tate's death, Nicholson slept with a hammer under his pillow and took a break from work to attend the hearing of the Manson case.

He starred in The Who's Tommy (1975) directed by Ken Russell and Michelangelo Ateneo's The Passenger (1975).

An American icon

McMurphy in the film version of Ken Keyes novel One Fluor Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Louise Fletcher, who played the role of Nurse Ratched, also won her the Best Actress Award.

Subsequently, he began to accept more extraordinary roles. Nicholsone played a small role in The Last Tycoon with Robert De Niro. Jack played a less sympathetic role in Arthur Penn's western The Draft Breaks, especially working with Marlon Brando. He then made his second directorial effort as the western comedy Goan's South. He said that his first film as a director was a 1971 abrupt release, called Drive, He Said.

Although he did not receive an Academy Award for the film version of Stanley Kubrick's Stephen King's The Signing (1980), it remains one of Nicholson's most important roles. His next Oscar, the Academy Award for Best Supporting.

Actor, for his role as retired astronaut Garrett Breedlew in the Terms of Endurance (1983), directed by James L. Brooks. Nicholson continued working diligently throughout the 80s, and The Postman Always Rings Twice (1981), Reds (1981), Prezi's Honor (1985), The Witches of Eastwick (1987), Broadcast News (1987), and Ironweed (1987) ) He acted in films like. He also received three Oscar nominations for Reds, Prezi's Honor and Ironweed.

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Nicholson refused to play John Book in Witness. The 1989 Batman film, in which Nicholson played the role of mental killer, villain and clown, became an international hit and earned Nicholson $ 6 million in a lucrative deal.

A Few Good Men film (1992), about an assassination in an American naval corps unit, enraged Colonel Nathan R. Nicholson received another Academy nomination for his role as Jessup.

Nicholson received the Academy Award for Next Best Actor for the role of Melvik Udal, a deranged writer and obsessed with a mental illness (obsessive compulsive disorder) in the romantic film As Good As It Gets (1997), which was then James L. Brooks. Along with Nicholson's Oscar, the film's heroine Helen Hunt also received the Academy Award for Best Actress, who played the role of a Manhattan hostess who plays a love / hate friendship with Udal, who often has dinner at that restaurant. , In which she works.

recent years

In November 2006, Nicholson began filming his next project, Rob Rainer's The Bucket List, for which he shaved his head. Nicholson visited a Los Angeles hospital to see how cancer patients overcome their illnesses.

private life

However, the relationship ended when the media reported that Rebecca Broussard had become pregnant with them. Nicholson and Broussard had two children, Lauryn Nicholson (born 1990) and Raymond Nicholson (born 1992). Jack's other children were Jennifer Nicholson (born Sandra Knight in 1963) and Honey Hallman (born Winnie Hallman in 1981).

Nicholson lived next to Marlene Brando for years at Mulholland Drive in Beverly Hills. After Brando's death in 2004, Nicholson bought his neighbor's bungalow for $ 6.1 million, which he intended to demolish.

Nicholson is a fan of the New York Yankees and Los Angeles Lakers. His presence at the Lakers Games is superb, as he is the season ticket holder since 1970 and has held season tickets for both The Forum and Staples grounds for the past 25 years. They have missed very few games.

Nicholson is a collector of twentieth-century and contemporary art, including the work of Scottish artist Jack Baiterianes.

Although he never made his political views public, Nicholson considered himself a lifelong Democrat. On February 4, 2008, he announced his support for Senator Hillary Clinton in the United States presidential race. In an interview on Rick Deejay's radio program, Nicholson stated, "Mrs. Clinton is raising all sorts of issues, such as health, what we know, prison reform, helping soldiers, raising voices for women and Americans." Speaking. And besides, it's time we get a better person as president. "

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